NOW:53208:USA01012
http://widgets.journalinteractive.com/cache/JIResponseCacher.ashx?duration=5&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.wp.myweather.net%2FeWxII%2F%3Fdata%3D*USA01012
70°
H 82° L 63°
Cloudy | 3MPH

Parents best equipped to make decisions on genetic testing, return of results

March 5, 2014

Technology often outpaces ethical discussions; this has become evident in the current recommendations around next-generation genomic testing and the way in which results are handled for pediatric patients. Expert working groups in genetics have recommended different policies. However, a team of researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin believe that until research possibly proves differently, parents are best-suited to make decisions about what genetic testing results are provided to children and their families.

The commentary is published in the American Journal of Bioethics http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265161.2013.879959. Kimberly A. Strong, PhD, assistant professor of bioethics and medical humanities and primary faculty for the Program in Genomics and Ethics at MCW, and Thomas May, PhD, the Ursula Von der Ruhr Professor of Bioethics at MCW, are the lead authors of the paper.

Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and MCW founded the world’s first clinical genomics sequencing clinic in late 2010. The opening of that clinic necessitated a strategy around the return of secondary results, also called incidental findings, which may be discovered in the exploration of the patient’s genome or exome while searching for primary causes of disease. The team adopted a strategy based on the current societal norms regarding parental authority.

“The law generally views parents to be in the best position to weigh the short-term and long-term interests of their children, and we believe that absent evidence that would indicate otherwise, the default position should be parental informed consent,” said Dr. Strong. “That informed consent involves detailed genetic counseling both before and after the decision to pursue genomic sequencing, so parents understand the choices they are making.”

Secondary findings can involve mutations in a gene that are known to cause disease, and may or may not have existing treatments, but can also involve mutations that carry with them a predisposition to develop disease (i.e. Alzheimer’s), but it is impossible to accurately predict at this time who will and who will not develop disease.

Other authors of the commentary include Arthur R. Derse, MD, JD, professor of bioethics and medical humanities and emergency medicine and director of the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities at MCW; David P. Dimmock, MD, associate professor of pediatric genetics at MCW and a clinical geneticist at CHW; Kaija Zusevics, MPH, PhD, Program in Genomics and Ethics postdoctoral fellow at MCW; Jessica Jeruzal, Program in Genomics and Ethics program coordinator at MCW; Elizabeth Worthey, PhD, assistant professor of pediatric genetics, MCW; David Bick, MD, professor and chief of genetics at MCW and CHW; Gunter Scharer, MD, associate professor of pediatric genetics at MCW and clinical geneticist at CHW; Alison La Pean Kirschner, MS, research genetic counselor at MCW; Ryan Spellecy, PhD, associate professor of bioethics at MCW; Michael H. Farrell, MD, associate professor of medicine at MCW; Jennifer Geurts, MS, genetic counseling manager at MCW; and Regan Veith, MS, genetic counselor at CHW.

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Suburban News Roundup

E-mail Newsletter

Your link to the biggest stories in the suburbs delivered Thursday mornings.


Enter your e-mail address above and click "Sign Up Now!" to begin receiving your e-mail newsletter
Get the Newsletter!

Login or Register to manage all your newsletter preferences.

Community Watch

» Wauwatosa to participate in "Click It or Ticket" enforcement 7/6

» Tosa East student completes leadership program at Yale University 7/6

» Leff's Lucky Town in Wauwatosa considers kitchen expansion 7/2

» Walker plans to file for president today 7/2

» Driver ejected from car after hitting tree in Wauwatosa 7/1

» Monarch habitat on the mend in Wauwatosa 7/1

» Wauwatosa Police Report: June 21-27 7/1

» Wauwatosa detective home from hospital after shooting 7/1

» Thai-namite plans new location in Wauwatosa's former City Market building Updated:  6/30

» Sports Notes: July 2, 2015 6/30

» Wauwatosa police say woman was dragged across parking lot in purse robbery 6/30

» Thirsty Duck brings duckpin bowling to Wauwatosa Updated:  6/30

» Kate Spade New York store to open at Mayfair Mall 6/29

» Suspect charged in shooting of Wauwatosa police officer Updated:  6/25

» Police identify Wauwatosa detective shot, injured in Milwaukee 6/23

» Tosa West student attended journalism conference in D.C. 6/23

» Wauwatosa school board approves 8 percent levy hike under preliminary budget 6/23

» Suspect in Tosa detective shooting charged in earlier armed robbery 6/22

» Tip leads police to suspect in shooting of Wauwatosa detective Updated:  6/20

» Suspect in shooting of Tosa detective eludes police Updated:  6/19

» Benji's Deli plans to open next to Camp Bar in Wauwatosa 6/19

» Indulgence Chocolatiers now open in Wauwatosa 6/19

» Wauwatosa police detective shot in Milwaukee 6/19

» Venturis roll out old menu with new spin at Tosa Bowl and Bun 6/16

» In 'one last try' to preserve Wauwatosa's Eschweiler buildings, Mandel seeks proposals 6/15

View All Posts Got a tip? Welcome rss

Advertisement

Advertisement

Hidden Tosa

 

"Hidden Tosa" is a semi-regular feature where reporter Rory Linnane explores the closed down and closed off parts of Wauwatosa.

2015 Writing Contest

 

(Click image for details)

Advertisement

Local Business Directory

CONNECT