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WHS Adoptable Animals

The Wisconsin Humane Society (WHS) is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to build a community where people value animals and treat them with respect and kindness. For more than 128 years, WHS has been saving the lives of animals in need. We offer adoption services that place 9,000 animals in new homes annually, veterinary services that save thousands of lives, educational programs that instill respect for animals, behavior services to assist guardians and a myriad of other initiatives that help end suffering for animals. We depend entirely on private donations to fund our programs and rely on volunteers in nearly every department. If you are interested in adopting, volunteering, enrolling in a class, taking a tour or making a donation, check out our comprehensive web site at wihumane.org. The adoptable animals' web pages are updated every 30 minutes!

Poor Economy Causes Families to Surrender Injured Puppies

 

You don’t have to look any further than the ICU at the Wisconsin Humane Society (WHS) for signs of a distressed economy. Just this week, three puppies with broken legs were surrendered to the shelter because the families couldn’t afford proper veterinary care.  As the economy worsens, WHS officials expect to see more cases of surrenders due to financial woes.

The Wisconsin Humane Society has seen a nearly 20% increase in surrenders since September. Many clients have reported losing jobs and even homes. Several of the surrendered animals have had injuries that families could not afford to treat.

Among the new patients are Rose, a 3-month-old Miniature Pinscher; Valentino, a 3-month-old Rottweiler; and Cupid, a 4-month-old Pomeranian. Tragically, Cupid has two broken legs, the painful result of a bad fall. The three pups join two other dogs, Panini and Prince, who are also in treatment with fractured legs.  It will cost the shelter thousands of dollars to treat them.

Although WHS does provide extensive medical services, the dogs may need to be sent to a specialist for more comprehensive care, greatly increasing the cost to restore the use of the dogs’ legs.  

The Wisconsin Humane Society receives no government funding and relies entirely upon donations to fund all their programs, including veterinary treatment for animals such as Rose, Valentino and Cupid.  If you’d like to contribute a donation to help these puppies, click here.

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